Monday Sept. 7

Posted on September 2nd in Community Calendar

Masonic Lodge meets the first Monday of each month at the Burns Masonic Lodge, 1210 W. Taylor, at 7 p.m.

The Burns Lions Club meets every Monday, except holidays, at noon at the Burns Elks Lodge. Those interested in serving the community and visitors are welcome. For more information call 541-573-4000.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Burns Fire Dept. meets each Monday at the Burns Fire Hall at 7 p.m.

The Hines Volunteer Fire Department meets at the Hines Fire Hall each Monday at 7 p.m. (except the last Monday of the month). Prospective members may contact Fire Chief Bob Spence at 541-573-7477 or 541-573-2251.

Narcotics Anonymous meets each Monday at 10 a.m. in the community room at Saginaw Village, 605 N. Saginaw. For more information call 541-589-4405.


Tuesday Sept. 8

Posted on September 2nd in Community Calendar

Hines Common Council meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at Hines City Hall, 101 E. Barnes, at 6:30 p.m.

The Harney County Library Foundation board of directors meets the second Tuesday of each month at the library at 5:30 p.m. The meetings are open to the public. For more information, call 541-573-7339.

Disabilities Services Advisory Council for Harney County meets the second Tuesday of each month at the state office building, 809 W. Jackson, at 1:30 p.m.

Symmetry Care Advisory Committee meets the second Tuesday of each month at Symmetry Care, 53 W. Washington, at 1:30 p.m.

The American Legion Auxiliary meets the second Tuesday of each month at 63 W. “C” Street at noon.

The Harney County Chamber Music Society meets the second and fourth Tuesday, September-November and January-March. The choir meets in the Burns High School band room from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. with Marianne Andrews directing. Singers ages 13-up are welcome.

The Harney County School District No. 3 board of directors meets at the District Office, 550 N. Court, the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m.

Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance Program (SHIBA) trained volunteers will be at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center, 17 S. Alder, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. each Tuesday to help with Medicare insurance needs or medications you cannot afford.


Classifieds

Posted on September 2nd in Classified Ads

Legals

PUBLIC NOTICE
TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE
T.S. No.: OR-15-659903-NH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, Lucine T. Schaffer as Grantor to TICOR TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY LLC , as Beneficiary, dated 10/23/2006, recorded 10/30/2006, in official records of HARNEY County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. and/or as fee/file/instrument/ microfilm / reception number 20062267 covering the following described real property situated in said County, and State, to-wit: APN: 2500/23-31/07DB EXHIBIT “A” Land in the City of Burns, Harney County, Oregon, as follows: In TWP 23 S., R. 31 E., W.M.: Sec. 7: A parcel of land in the SEY4 which is described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of Block “A”, Second Addition to the City of Bums; thence East, along the South boundary of Ease Etl Street, 402.6 feet to the intersection of the South boundary of East “E” Street and the West boundary of North Elm Street; thence South 515 feet, more or less, to the intersection of the West boundary of North Elm Street and the North boundary of Riverside Drive; thence N 89°22’ E., along the North boundary of Riverside Drive, 160 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING: thence North 100 feet, more or less, to a point which is 413.8 feet South of the South boundary of East “E” Street; thence East, parallel to and a constant distance of 413.8 feet from the South boundary of East “E” Street, 75 feet; thence South 100 feet, more or less, to the North boundary of Riverside Drive; thence S. 89°22’ W., along the North boundary of Riverside Drive, 75 feet, more or less, to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO; A portion of the parcel of land described in Book 97, Page 5, in Deed Records of Harney County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the True Point of Beginning of said described parcel; thence Southerly along the West line of said parcel 40 feet to the True Point of Beginning of the portion being described; thence Easterly parallel to the South line of the main parcel 4 feet; thence Southerly, parallel to the West line 60 feet, to the South line; thence Westerly along the South line 4 feet, to the West line; thence Northerly along the West line 60 feet to the Point of Beginning. Commonly known as: 528 E. RIVERSIDE DRIVE, BURNS, OR 97720.

The undersigned hereby certifies that based upon business records there are no known written assignments of the trust deed by the trustee or by the beneficiary and no appointments of a successor trustee have been made, except as recorded in the records of the county or counties in which the above described real property is situated. Further, no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the trust deed, or, if such action has been instituted, such action has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.752(7). Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.752 (3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. There is a default by grantor or other person owing an obligation, performance of which is secured by the trust deed, or by the successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of such provision.

The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: Delinquent Payments: Payment Information From Through Total Payments 2/1/2011 7/8/2015 $25,062.44 Late Charges From Through Total Late Charges 2/1/2011 7/8/2015 $126.54 Beneficiary’s Advances, Costs, And Expenses Late Charge Balance $126.54 Escrow Advances $11,847.95 Interest On Advances $12,603.90 Fees $50.00 Recoverable Corporate Advance $2,325.55 Total Advances: $26,953.94 TOTAL FORECLOSURE COST: $4,876.50 TOTAL REQUIRED TO REINSTATE: $32,873.00 TOTAL REQUIRED TO PAYOFF: $102,615.80 By reason of the default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to- wit: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee’s fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents.

Whereof, notice hereby is given that Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, the undersigned trustee will on 10/30/2015 at the hour of 10:00 am, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, Inside the main lobby of the County Courthouse located at 450 N. Buena Vista Avenue, Burns, Oregon 97720 County of HARNEY, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.778 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s and attorney’s fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Other than as shown of record, neither the beneficiary nor the trustee has any actual notice of any person having or claiming to have any lien upon or interest in the real property hereinabove described subsequent to the interest of the trustee in the trust deed, or of any successor in interest to grantor or of any lessee or other person in possession of or occupying the property, except: Name and Last Known Address and Nature of Right, Lien or Interest LUCINE SCHAFFER 528 E. RIVERSIDE DRIVE BURNS, OR 97720 Original Borrower.

For Sale Information Call: 800-827-4822 or Login to: www.tdsf.com.

In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to this grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee’s deed has been issued by Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington. If any irregularities are discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer’s money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney.

If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Without limiting the trustee’s disclaimer of representations or warranties, Oregon law requires the trustee to state in this notice that some residential property sold at a trustee’s sale may have been used in manufacturing methamphetamines, the chemical components of which are known to be toxic. Prospective purchasers of residential property should be aware of this potential danger before deciding to place a bid for this property at the trustee’s sale.

NOTICE TO TENANTS: TENANTS OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY HAVE CERTAIN PROTECTIONS AFFORDED TO THEM UNDER ORS 86.782 AND POSSIBLY UNDER FEDERAL LAW. ATTACHED TO THIS NOTICE OF SALE, AND INCORPORATED HEREIN, IS A NOTICE TO TENANTS THAT SETS FORTH SOME OF THE PROTECTIONS THAT ARE AVAILABLE TO A TENANT OF THE SUBJECT REAL PROPERTY AND WHICH SETS FORTH CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS THAT MUST BE COMPLIED WITH BY ANY TENANT IN ORDER TO OBTAIN THE AFFORDED PROTECTION, AS REQUIRED UNDER ORS 86.771. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. 

TS No: OR-15-659903-NH

Dated: 6/17/2015

Quality Loan Service Corporation of Washington, as Trustee

Signature By: Nina Hernandez, Assistant Secretary

Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corporation 411 Ivy Street San Diego, CA 92101.

Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1st Ave. South, Suite 202, Seattle, WA 98104.

Toll Free: (866) 925-0241 IDS.

Pub #0085892

Publish Aug. 19, 26, Sept. 2 and 9, 2015

______________________________

PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICATION
HARNEY COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION

NOTICE is hereby given that a public hearing will be held before the Harney County Planning Commission in the Circuit Courtroom, which is upstairs in the Harney County Courthouse, 450 N. Buena Vista, Burns, Oregon, on Wednesday, September 16th, 2015 at the hour of 7:00 P.M. to hear the application of Curt and Kaeko Blackburn to apply for a PARTITION to divide a 342.32-acre tract of land into three parcels. The tract is currently composed of two taxlots; TL 1600, 187.00 acres, and TL 2800, 155.32 acres. The preliminary plat proposes three newly created parcels; “Parcel 1” at ±5.9 acres, “Parcel 2” at ±6.0 acres, and “Parcel 3” at ±330.42 acres.

The applicants are also applying for a NON FARM DWELLING on proposed “Parcel 1.” The property is located approximately 3 miles west on HWY 20. The property is in the EFRU-1 zone and further described as follows:

The effected tract is described as follows:

T 22 S., R 31 E.,W.M. TL 2800

LAND IN HARNEY COUNTY, OREGON, AS FOLLOWS:

IN TOWNSHIP 22 S., RANGE 31 E.,W.M.

SECTION 34: W1/2SW1/4; SE1/4SW1/4; SW1/4SE1/4; SAVE AND EXCEPT

HIGHWAY ROAD RIGHT OF WAY CONVEYED TO THE STATE OF OREGON, BY AND

THROUGH ITS STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION, BY DEED RECORDED JAN 16, 1937,

IN BOOK 37, PAGE 388, DEED RECORDS.

T 22 S., R 31 E.,W.M. SEC 33 TL 1600

LAND IN HARNEY COUNTY, OREGON, AS FOLLOWS:

IN TOWNSHIP 22 S., RANGE 31 E.,W.M.

SECTION 33: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 33,

50 FEET NORTH FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, SAID POINT

BEING ON THE NORTH LINE OF US HWY 20,

THENCE N 1,915 FEET;

THENCE N 81* WEST 2,891 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST LINE OF

RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY;

THENCE ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID RIGHT OF WAY IN A SOUTHWESTERLY

DIRECTION 2,870 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE LINE OF US HWY 20;

THENCE EAST ALONG NORTH LINE OF US HWY 20 A DISTANCE OF 4,490 FEET

MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

ALSO: A SECTION OF THE EASTERLY 1/2 OF THE OREGON AND NORTHWESTERN

RAILROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY, FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE MALHEUR RAILROAD, AND

LYING IN THE SW1/4 OF SECTION 33, PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE SAID RAILROAD CENTER LINE

WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF US HIGHWAY 20; SAID POINT

BEING 723 FEET, MORE OR LESS, EAST AND N. 34*44’ E., 60.8 FEET,

MORE OR LESS, FROM THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 33;

THENCE N. 33*44’ E., ALONG SAID RAILROAD CENTER LINE 2825 FEET,

MORE OR LESS, TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH BOUNDARY EXTENEDED

OF THAT TRACT AS DESCRIBED IN INSTRUMENT #900871 OF THE HARNEY COUNTY

DEED RECORDS;

THENCE S. 81*00’ E., 33.3 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE INTERSECTION

OF THE EASTERLY RAILROAD RIGHT OF WAY LINE WITH THE NORTH BOUNDARY

THENCE S. 34*44’ W., ALONG SAID RAILROAD EASTERLY LINE 2870 FEET,

MORE OR LESS, TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE

OF SAID HIGHWAY;

THENCE WEST, ALONG SAID HIGHWAY RIGHT OF WAY 36.5 FEET, MORE OR

LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

Brandon McMullen,
Harney County Planning Director

Harney County Planning Department #8110

Publish Sept. 2, 2015

______________________________

Invitation to Bid

Harney Education Service District (HESD) is now accepting bids for roof replacement at the HESD Fillmore building (formerly Fillmore School) located at 779 West Fillmore in Burns.

Interested bidders are encouraged to visit and inspect the site before submitting a bid.  Contractors must be licensed and bonded.  Please provide Contractor’s License with bid along of Proof of Worker Compensation and Liability Insurance. Proof of $1,000,000 General Liability.

Bids must include removal and disposal of existing roof, prep work and repairs to decking as needed. The successful bidder will supply all materials, equipment and labor necessary to complete the job. All bids should include cleanup and any fees necessary to the completion of the project. i.e. inspection.

Please submit bids showing the costs using: Asphalt composite shingles.

Metal roofing materials
Contractor shall provide a warranty against defects in materials and workmanship for a period of one (1) year.

Bids will be received through 4:00 p.m. September 11th, 2015. For questions, please call 541-573-2122. Bids must be sealed and may be mailed to:

HARNEY ESD Regional Service Center
P.O. Box 460
Burns, Oregon 97720

OR delivered directly to 25 Fairview Heights

Project must be completed by no later than October 16, 2015.

Publish Sept. 2 and 9, 2015

______________________________

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Burns City Council, acting as the Local Contract Review Board, will hold a public hearing at the Burns City Hall Council Chambers, located at 242 S. Broadway, Burns, Oregon, on September 9, 2015 at 6:00 p.m. for the purpose of taking comments on the City’s draft findings for an exemption from the competitive bidding requirements of Oregon Revised Statutes Chapter 279B for the procurement of a 2006 Ford Expedition.  Any interested person may appear and present comment.  Any person may protest the request for approval of the special procurement in accordance with ORS 279B.400 and OAR 137-047-0700.  Copies of the draft findings may be obtained by request in person at City Hall or by phone.  The address and phone number for requests are:

Burns City Hall Council Chambers
242 S. Broadway
Burns, Oregon 97720
(541) 573-6781

Attn: Dauna Wensenk

Publish Sept. 2, 2015

______________________________

Pine Creek SD #5 is accepting Letters of Interest for a part-time Custodian for the 2015-2016 School Year.  Start date approximately September 15, 2015.  A description of duties may be obtained from the district clerk.

Current Salary is $250 per month.

Deadline: September 14, 2015 starting at 7:00 P.M.

Contact Person:  Julie Opie, Clerk at (541) 573-3229

693 West “B” Street, Burns, OR  97720

Letters of Interest should  be mailed to:

Julie Opie, Clerk
Pine Creek School District #5
P.O. Box 826
Hines, OR 97738

Publish Sept. 2, 2015

 

 

PERSONAL/MISC

ONE STOP SHOP! has expanded!  We’re bigger & better than ever with more gifts, more jewelry, more everything, including fresh produce! 29 E. Washington. 541-589-4249.

AH TFN

______________________________

We carry Whirlpool Appliances, including freezers.
We also sell water heaters.

Burns Electric
70 S. Fairview
541-573-6626

BE 1/10/07 TFN

_______________________________

24 HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-573-7176. HHOPE offers free, confidential services for victims of physical, sexual and verbal abuse. Qualified staff, volunteers provide shelter, transportation and referrals with support and care.

HH 7/19/12 TFN

______________________________

“HAVE CAMERA, WILL SHOOT! I do school pictures, weddings, parties, family portraits, brandings, rodeos — anything you can think of! Reasonable rates! You can print your pictures here and have them framed here too! One Stop Shop, 29 E. Washington, 541-589-4249.”

AH 8/26 TFN

 

WANTED

WTB
Paying cash for old gas station items.

 Gas pumps, air meters, oil can racks, porcelain and tin signs, globes, electric clocks, etc.  Need not be in working condition

Warren Burch
Middleton, ID
208-585-6257

WB 8/5-9/2 5t.

 

JOB MARKET

City of Hines is accepting applications for a Public Works Superintendent. Applicants must have or be able to timely obtain certificates from DEQ and OHA for wastewater treatment and water system supervision. High School diploma or GED, trade school or additional training in public works techniques and principles, or combination of experience and training preferred. Pay depends on experience. Benefits package includes PERS retirement, medical, dental and vision insurance. Subject to call-back and may exceed 40 hours. Must pass background check. Contact Oregon Employment Department for further duties, screening and application. Open until filled.

CoH  8/12 TFN

______________________________

WANTED: Looking for ranch hand for NE Oregon commercial cow/calf operation. Must be honest, responsible, conscientious, and have a passion for ranching. Duties include, but are not limited to: feeding, calving cows/heifers, flood irrigations, and doctoring.  Good animal husbandry skills and horsemanship required. Must be a motivated self-starter with effective communication skills. CDL not required, but a plus. Salary and compensation DOE.  Long-term employment for the right individual.  Must have knowledge of loaders, tractors, backhoes, and equipment repair and maintenance. Please call (541)-403-1368. Email resume and references to brokenbarw@outlook.com or fax to Mackenzie Ranch 541-523-4790.

BM 8/26-9/16 4t

______________________________

Harney County Community Corrections is seeking a Community Service Work Crew Supervisor. The Work Crew Supervisor arranges and supervises the community service work crew, which consists of individuals on probation as well as jail inmates. The Work Crew Supervisor maintains communication with agencies and individuals within the community to plan and coordinate activities for the work crew. The Work Crew Supervisor transports the work crew to job sites in the community. This position is responsible for accurately tracking the hours of each of the work crew participants and turning in those hours to the Probation Officers. This position involves physical labor.

Position is part time, with flexibility in scheduling at $13.17/hr.

MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS:

Candidate must have a valid driver’s license.  Must have time management skills and strong communication skills.  Candidate must have knowledge of and be able to operate tools for various projects. Candidate will be required to pass a criminal background check.

Applications can be picked up and dropped off at Harney Community Corrections, 348 W. Adams #B, Burns, OR 97720. Deadline to apply is Friday, September 4, 2015 at 5:00 P.M.

LP 8/26-9/2 2t

______________________________

Pine Creek SD #5 is accepting Letters of Interest for a part-time Custodian for the 2015-2016 School Year.  Start date approximately September 15, 2015.  A description of duties may be obtained from the district clerk.

Current Salary is $250 per month.

Deadline: September 14, 2015 starting at 7:00 P.M.

Contact Person:  Julie Opie, Clerk at (541) 573-3229

693 West “B” Street, Burns, OR  97720

Letters of Interest should  be mailed to:
Julie Opie, Clerk
Pine Creek School District #5
P.O. Box 826
Hines, OR 97738

PCSD 9/2 – 9/9 2t

 

FIREWOOD

Firewood for sale. Call 541-573-5030.

BR 1/8 TFN

 

RANCH / FARM EQUIPMENT

2 Older Pierce Pivots for sale.  1) 10 tower, new vision panel with reverse — $14,000. 1) 9 tower — $9,000.  Located in Riley. Call 541-620-0666.

WS 9/2 1t

 

HAY/ LIVESTOCK FEED

Grass Alfalfa hay for sale. Day phone 541-589-1583. Evenings 541-573-2946.

MS 8/19-9/9 4t

_______________________________

Alfalfa with some grass.  Small Bales. 1st and 2nd Cutting. 541-493-4669.

JW 8/19-9/9 4t

_______________________________

Custom hay stacking, Kyle Mastre. We can stack 3×4’s and 3×3’s. Pricing is stacked on the edge of the field. Will quote further distances. 3×3, $3.75/bale. 3×4, $5.25/bale. Ward Mastre, 541-589-3889.

KM 8/26-9/16 4t

_______________________________

SERVICES OFFERED

Computer Questions?
Zieber Computer Repair / Tutoring

• Repairs, Maintenance, Sales, Parts
• Upgrades, Installations
• Personalized/Group Tutoring
• Senior Citizen Discount

“Now Offering Rentals!”

Microsoft Certified

Professional (MCP) A+

541-573-1143

jonzieber@yahoo.com

JZ 1/12 TFN

___________________

Highland Hair Fashions is open Monday through Friday, 11:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Saturdays by appointment. Customers are always welcome. Please call for an appointment. 119 Woodland, Hines. Turn right at Pettibone off of Hines Blvd., go up hill to stop sign, turn left on Woodland. Fourth house on left.

SL 8/12-9/2 4t

_______________________________

Veteran Help

Veteran Service Officers
Guy McKay
P.O. Box 728 / 17 S. Alder Ave, Burns, OR
541-573-1342

Tom Wolf
541-475-5228
541-410-2176

Senate Contacts

Senator Ron Wyden
Wayne Kinney (Field Rep)
541-330-9142

Senator Jeff Merkley
Karen Wagner (Field Rep)
541-278-1129

Joel Corcoran
503-326-3386

Will Gmaz (Veteran Issues)
503-326-3386

Congress Contact
Congressman Greg Walden
Cole (Veterans and active duty outreach caseworker)
541-389-4408

 

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Office space ready to rent or remodel with longer lease. Perfect for two businesses sharing space. 541-573-6608.

CB 8/12 to 9/2 4t

 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

PRICE REDUCED BY $10,000. Newly-remodeled 5bd/2.5ba Burns home. Attached garage, enclosed back yard, oil F/A, wood insert, deck, garden space, storage. $149,900. Broker-owned. www.jdreburns.com or call 541-413-0001.

JD 4/1 TFN

_______________________________

Newer Custom Home in Drewsey, Oregon: (2) bedroom (2) bath, greenhouse, storage shed and garden spot, 30×40 detached garage/ shop with 3/4 bath, all on 200’x125’ lot. Malheur River hunt unit plus fishing nearby, $195,000 Terms owner. Please call Nancy for more information 541-589-0921.

NC 8/19-9/9 4t


PIT project held in Malheur National Forest

by Steve Howe
Burns Times-Herald

The Passport in Time (PIT) program flag flies, with the archaeological testing site in the background. (Photo by STEVE HOWE)

The Passport in Time (PIT) program flag flies, with the archaeological testing site in the background. (Photo by STEVE HOWE)

Thousands of years ago, people were regularly visiting – and making tools at – an upland Silvies River site in what is now the Malheur National Forest (MNF).

That’s what archaeological surveys and testing, conducted by MNF archaeology staff and volunteers with the Passport in Time (PIT) program, have indicated.

“This beautiful location, nestled among willows and large Ponderosa pine, may have been a customary stop for early inhabitants as they moved within the forest,” said Pete Cadena, district archaeologist on the Emigrant Creek Ranger District of MNF.

Recently, United States Forest Service (USFS) professionals discovered “a relatively old American Indian spear point estimated to be seven to eight thousand years old,” said Don Hann, archaeologist and heritage program manager at MNF.

PIT volunteers helped staff archaeologists complete archaeological testing at the site this past week, Aug. 17-21, and the information learned will contribute to a better understanding of how the local area was used in the past, said Hann.

The PIT program

PIT is a volunteer program through the USFS. Participants can apply for a variety of archaeological and historic preservation projects in locations around the country. Once selected, they spend one week working with USFS officials and learning about the local area and subject matter.

Cadena described PIT as an “extraordinary program,” and he praised work done by volunteers.

Volunteers at MNF are most often retirees and university students. They receive a “passport” and a PIT passport number. Each time the volunteers help on a project, the project leader stamps the volunteers’ passports and documents their hours.

The process

Cadena said there are usually two PIT projects per year on MNF. One involves lab work with previously-collected artifacts, and the other is field work.

Last week’s project was the latter. Ten volunteers and five archaeology technicians participated throughout the five days, uncovering evidence of a prehistoric toolmaking site.

The week began with a general project overview, as well as safety reminders about staying hydrated and taking breaks during the work. Following that, the group spent a few hours conducting an initial survey, which involves walking across the site in a line, scanning the surface for debitage (rock flakes resulting from the manufacture of stone tools) and other artifacts and placing pin flags at those locations.

The survey continues with shovel test probes. Several spots are selected to examine the subsurface content of the site. Each probe is 50 centimeters by 50 centimeters (about 20 inches by 20 inches) square, and is carefully tested. As each test unit is dug further down, the volunteers and technicians carefully examine the upturned soil, looking for debitage or partial or complete tools. The soil is then placed into buckets and hauled over to one-eighth-inch wire mesh sifting screens, where others work to scour the dirt for smaller flakes remaining.

For every 10 centimeters of depth, a report is filed by one of the archaeological technicians. They note on a grid where larger items were found, soil types encountered, and a variety of other information. The process is repeated until they hit “sterile” soil – the point at which they stop finding the artifacts – or the information needed is acquired.

All collected flakes are bagged and labeled. Cadena said the next step is to start typing them. Obsidian flakes make up the majority of what is found on MNF. They are measured and divided into three categories – primary, secondary, and tertiary. These categories indicate the amount of cortex (the original, rough outer surface of the obsidian) present on the flake – from primary with the most to tertiary with none.

Cadena said this categorization indicates what stages in the manufacturing of projectile points were completed on the site. Primary flakes are those that are taken off first when carving a point. Secondary flakes result as the process progresses, and tertiary flakes are the product of the finishing stages.

If there are an even number of flakes found in each category, it can be inferred that people were starting and finishing tools at the site. That appears to be the case at this site, Cadena explained. A wide range of flakes were found.

Volunteer value

Cadena said everything that’s found is archived, and a final report is written. This provides a baseline of information for those wanting to do further research on this site in the future.

“The reality is, 10 years from now, 20 years from now, somebody could utilize this information even more, so the work [done by the PIT project participants] will just keep going for years and years,” he said.

And Cadena would know. He did his graduate research on MNF. He said the site he studied had five or six PIT projects conducted on it, and that data allowed him to formulate his question and pursue his research.

“For a graduate student, that’s pretty awesome, because you usually don’t get all of that support. In this case, I was able to have my own site and look at data – all because of years and years of PIT volunteers’ hard work,” Cadena said.

But it’s not just the professionals who find value in the projects.

Rick and Mary Gant of the Richland, Wash., area are no strangers to the PIT program. But up until now, they had only done historic preservation projects.

“This is our first adventure in archaeology,” said Rick.

He noted that a complete Elko point had been found during the week.

“It’s pretty humbling, when you find something that was created for hunting a couple thousand years ago, and nobody’s seen it since,” he said.

“It’s been very interesting,” Mary said. She added that in the future she’d like to try other archaeology projects looking at different historical periods. In terms of the work tasks, she said she preferred the digging to the sifting, as she didn’t feel as confident in identifying the smaller pieces to pick out.

“I like to learn new things, but I also want to feel like I’m doing something useful,” she said.

Mary, a retired computer programmer, said she and Rick have not only personally enjoyed participating in PIT projects, but see a bigger meaning behind that participation.

“For years, we have backpacked and done a lot on Forest Service lands, and we felt [volunteering with PIT] was a way to kind of give back a little for all the enjoyment we’ve had,” she said.

Jim Goertzen, a retired counselor from St. Helena, Calif., came to this year’s MNF PIT project with 11 archaeology projects already under his belt. He said he has participated in between one and three projects per summer for the last six years since his retirement. Most were located in California, but PIT has also taken him to Nevada and Arizona. He said there weren’t as many projects offered in his home state this year, so he came to Oregon.

“The projects are a lot of fun, and you get to meet a lot of fun people,” Goertzen said.

He added that he’s enjoyed learning about the ingenuity of prehistoric peoples in the manufacturing of stone tools.

“I just have nothing but respect for them,” he said.

Goertzen said he’s always had a strong interest in history, and after retiring, he thought about going back to school. However, he didn’t want to sit in a classroom – he preferred hands-on experiences. So after reading an article about PIT in American Archaeology magazine, he went for it.

“Here I’m surrounded by university-trained people, and I’m getting way more from them than I would in a classroom in six months. In one week’s time, I’m getting more than 40 hours of classroom time, as far as I’m concerned. It’s really good,” said Goertzen.

On Thursday, volunteers took a break and made a trip to the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, and at the end of the day on Friday, Cadena provided instruction on using an atlatl, or spear-thrower.

This year was special because it marked the 25th anniversary of the PIT program, and volunteers went home with commemorative pins.

Get involved

The PIT program offers a number of opportunities to volunteers. According to its website, this includes: “archaeological survey and excavation, rock art restoration, archival research, historic structure restoration, oral history gathering, and analysis and curation of artifacts.”

For more information, or to apply for any PIT project around the country, visit www.passportintime.com.


Assistance available for planning efforts

by Samantha White
Burns Times-Herald

Jim Rue, Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) director, and Jon Jinings, DLCD community services specialist, attended the Harney County Court meeting on Thursday, Aug. 20 to discuss Goal 5, a broad statewide planning goal that covers more than a dozen resources, including wildlife habitats, historic places, and aggregate (gravel).

Originally adopted in 1974, Goal 5 and related Oregon Administrative Rules describe how cities and counties are to plan and zone land to conserve resources listed in the goal.

Harney County Judge Steve Grasty said the court has been discussing whether to complete the Goal 5 process for a while. Although some pieces have been updated, it’s been decades since the county has completed the Goal 5 process entirely.

Grasty said the decision is partially driven by the sage grouse administrative rule that the Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) adopted July 24. The rule establishes a procedure for considering development proposals on lands identified as significant sage grouse habitat.

“I think we got the sage grouse administrative rule wrong,” Grasty said. “If there is a reason to do [Goal 5 planning] it’s the potential of advantage for the people who live here.”

Jinings said that, although the county would have to demonstrate that it can provide an equivalent level of sage grouse protection, the Goal 5 process might allow it to “provide those protections in a different way that feels better — feels more right to Harney County.”

Rue agreed that Goal 5 planning could give the county more flexibility.

He said, “If you write it, you write it specific to the county and the needs of the county, which are different from the state, potentially, and are potentially different from adjoining counties.”

However, Rue warned that the county may find Goal 5 planning expensive, labor intensive, and politically difficult.

Harney County Commissioner Dan Nichols asked whether Harney County’s people could be listed as a significant resource in the goal.

Grasty added, “We think people are a significant resource. To protect them, we are going to protect 100 percent of their property. The state rule now says we can only protect 3 percent of their property. The rest is out of bounds.”

He explained that the LCDC rule limits direct impacts from human-caused disturbance to no more than 3 percent of any core area of sage grouse habitat.

Rue replied that this would only apply to uses beyond agriculture and forestry.

However, Nichols explained that many agriculture businesses are required to diversify in order to support their operations.

Rue replied, “As long as there is a direct connection to crops being grown on the land, it’s outright permitted.”

“There is no prohibition on someone making an application for anything,” Jinings added. “There will be things that are harder to justify based on the way the rule operates, but there is a whole menu of things that don’t require consideration at all.”

However, Grasty said he feared that the “conservation community” would litigate some of these decisions.

Additionally, he asked whether habitat mapping could be reevaluated if new studies are conducted.

Jinings said he thought a different mapping arrangement could be considered, but it would have to be backed by substantial evidence and completed by people who have “the right credentials to make those calls.”

He added, “At this point, I don’t think we should take any ideas off the table,” explaining that he’s willing to work with the county to come up with creative solutions.

Rue added that financial and technical assistance would be available for the county to assist with Goal 5 planning.

Grasty said that, if the county decides to engage in the Goal 5 process, it’d focus on more than just sage grouse. He explained that the county’s people, culture and customs would need to be counted among its significant resources.

“Our job is to protect the people in the place, not to protect the birds,” he said.

Grasty concluded that the court will need to decide whether it makes sense to take on the Goal 5 process. And, if so, the court will need to decide how much of the process it can afford to complete.

“You’ve got the hard task of deciding whether or not to pursue [Goal 5],” Rue said.

Grasty thanked Rue and Jinings for working with the court.

•••

The court agreed to appoint new members and ratify current members serving on the Local Community Advisory Council (LCAC).

Subsequently, Grasty mentioned that the county’s public health and home health and hospice programs “have become incredibly expensive,” and the county may want to consider contracting them out to other entities.

“If we keep funding these programs at the level that we are, we will be cutting something else,” he said.

Nichols said, “The community may be happy spending those funds.” However, he added that, “it’s a pretty necessary discussion if the budgetary needs are what they are.”

Grasty said, “I don’t like us even having to have this conversation, but I think we have to.” He added, “If we do this, we have to make sure that we do it strategically and in a manner that makes sense to the community.”

He suggested holding open houses to engage the community in the discussion. He said he’d also like to involve the LCAC and asked to include the conversation on the council’s next meeting agenda.

•••

The court also discussed Intergovernmental Agreement 5119 between Harney County and the state of Oregon for correctional services.

Grasty also complimented Community Corrections Director Lodi Presley for the work she’s doing.

“She’s flat making a difference,” he said.

Grasty said Presley has been looking at options to secure transitional housing for people who’ve been recently released from prison, explaining that the county has been paying for them to stay in hotel rooms, which is not cost effective. Hotel staff have also expressed that they will not house sex offenders.

Grasty said the tenants would have to meet certain stipulations in order to live in the county’s transitional housing. For example, they’d be obligated to keep the house clean and maintained. They’d also have to abstain from drug and alcohol use, among other requirements.

Harney County Commissioner Pete Runnels suggested putting some of these people to work at Rimrock Recycling.

“I think that’s a great idea,” Grasty replied, adding that they’d have the opportunity to learn work skills and earn money to pay restitution.

Ultimately, the court agreed to postpone signing the agreement until they can review the document more carefully.

•••

Veterans Service Officer Guy McKay attended the meeting to provide an update on veterans services.

McKay reported that he’s enjoyed working with Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs Director Cameron Smith.

McKay also reported that, last year, he used a portion of program funding to advertise veterans services, and the response was incredible. He garnered more than 100 new clients.

This year, McKay said he’d like to use some program funding to hire a part-time receptionist who can help him manage his appointments, as he hopes to add another 100 clients in the next 18 months.

McKay also announced that veterans will receive free admission to the Harney County Fair, Rodeo and Race Meet on Saturday, Sept. 12.

“You’ve done a great job, and we appreciate it,” Grasty told McKay.

•••

In other business, the court:

• upon recommendation from Harney County Watershed Council (HCWC) Coordinator Karen Moon, appointed Rachel Beaubian, Susan Ramsey and Pat Sharp to the HCWC;

• approved an application from Tree Top Ranches to name a road on their private property Brown Ranch Lane;

• discussed a letter from Harney County Weed Control Supervisor Jim Campbell regarding Medusahead treatments. Grasty said he believed there was plenty of room in the budget to provide the treatments, but said the budget may need to be revisited in the future;

• received a letter from Kimberly Lindsay, Grant County Health Department administrator, stating that Community Counseling Solutions (doing business as Grant County Health Department) decided to terminate its contract with Harney County for drinking water services. Lindsay explained that Ray Huff is retiring Aug. 31, and the department has been unable to recruit and retain certified personnel to replace him. As a result, Grant County will return its drinking water program back to the state. Grasty said Harney County will need to do the same;

• received a letter from Susan Christensen of the Department of Environmental Quality regarding a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event to be held in Burns Oct. 3;

• learned from Grasty that there was a jet fuel spill on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land near Coleman Creek. No one was injured, and a BLM hazmat crew was able to clean up and contain the spill;

• learned from Harney County Roads Supervisor Eric Drushella that the Oregon Department of Transportation agreed with the court’s suggestion to set the speed zone on Stanclift Lane from Foley Drive to Eben Ray Lane to 35 mph.

The next regularly-scheduled meeting of the county court will be held Wednesday, Sept. 2, at 10 a.m. in Judge Grasty’s office at the courthouse.


Harney County Dollars for Scholars would like to announce fall scholarships available for Harney County students who have completed at least one year of college.

The scholarships available are as follows:

• The Alycia Jenkins Memorial Ag Scholarship, started with a donation from Wilbur-Ellis Company. Founded in 1921, Wilbur Ellis is a leading international marketer and distributor of agricultural products, animal feed and specialty chemicals and ingredients. This scholarship is for students majoring in agriculture.

• Richard Hotchkiss Memorial Scholarship for agriculture students who have attained at least junior  status.

• Marion Lashbaugh Memorial Scholarship for female students attending Oregon State University.

• Helen Figg Memorial Scholarship for students majoring in school counseling or teaching.

• Olive Bridge Fund Scholarship for teaching majors or majors in the health sciences.

• Harney County Dollars for Scholars scholarships are available for all majors.

The deadline for applying for these scholarships is Sept. 30, 2015.

To complete an application, students need to access the Dollars for Scholars website and complete an online profile to see if they are eligible. The website may be accessed by searching for Harney County Dollars for Scholars, and selecting the “Students and Parents” tab.

If students have questions or are having difficulty with the website, please call Debbie at 541-573-3956 or email darntz@centurytel.net.


A celebration of life and memorial dinner for Bill Robertson, who passed away in July 2015, will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 6, at the Drewsey Hall in Drewsey. The meat will be provided, salads and desserts will be appreciated.

Bill was a longtime rancher in Drewsey, and then moved to Ontario to retire and enjoy life.


Wednesday Aug. 26

Posted on August 26th in Community Calendar

High Desert Park and Recreation District board of directors meets the fourth Wednesday of each month in their office at Ponderosa Village, at 7 p.m.

Harney County Health District board of directors meets the fourth Wednesday of each month in the board conference room of the hospital, in the entrance off N. Grand, at 6 p.m.

Burns City Council meets the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at Burns City Hall, 242 S. Broadway, at 6 p.m.

Burns Butte Sportsmens Club will be having Twilight Trap Practice Wednesday evenings from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. every week now through September at the range on Radar Hill. All levels of shooters are welcome, and instruction will be available for beginners.

Storytime for preschoolers is scheduled at the Harney County Library, 80 W. “D” St., each Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Contact the Harney County Library for more information, 541-573-6670.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets each Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns.

ALANON, an ongoing support group for friends and families of alcoholics, meets every Wednesday from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns. Please use the north side door. For more information, call 541-589-0329.

A Women’s AA meeting is held every Wednesday at noon at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns.


Thursday Aug. 27

Posted on August 26th in Community Calendar

Harney County Soil and Water Conservation District board of directors meets the fourth Thursday of each month at the USDA Service Center in Hines at 4:30 p.m. The public is welcome to attend.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Kiwanis Club of Burns-Hines meets for a no-host luncheon at noon each Thursday at Bella Java, 314 N. Broadway in Burns.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets at noon each Thursday at Hines City Hall, 101 E. Barnes. Call 541-573-2896.

Tai Chi for Better Balance with Diane Rapaport is held each Tuesday and Thursday at Harney County Senior and Community Services Center from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. — free.


Friday Aug. 28

Posted on August 26th in Community Calendar

Linda Peterson of La Grande will be featured artist at Gallery 15, 76 E. Washington Street in Burns. The public is invited to a reception to meet the artist on Aug. 28 from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. The event includes a wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres. Contact: Marjorie Thelen, 541-413-0958.

Oregon Old Time Fiddlers, District 9, meets the first, third and fourth Friday of each month. Call Micky, 541-573-2515, for time and place.

The Harney County Health Department is available at the Harney County Senior Center, 17 S. Alder, to check blood pressure the third Friday of each month from 10 a.m. to noon. There is no charge for the clinic and results can be forwarded to a physician or nurse practitioner at your request.

A recovery group, “Celebrate Recovery,” meets each Friday at the Harney County Church of the Nazarene, 311 Roe Davis Ave. in Hines. Snacks served at 5:30 p.m. The main meeting is held at 6 p.m. and small group sessions are at 7 p.m. For more information, call 541-573-7100.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets each Friday at 10 a.m. at Harney District Hospital in the small conference room near the cafeteria.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets each Friday at Symmetry Care at 5 p.m.


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