Friday Dec. 25

Posted on December 23rd in Community Calendar

Merry Christmas!


Saturday Dec. 26

Posted on December 23rd in Community Calendar

No scheduled events for this day.


Sunday Dec. 27

Posted on December 23rd in Community Calendar

A free community dinner, eat in or take out (no strings attached), will be held from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 27, at Burns Elks Lodge. Call 541-573-6170.

Overeaters Anonymous meets each Sunday at 1 p.m. in the Harney District Hospital Annex (downstairs in cafeteria area).Enter through the cafeteria door on North Grand. For more information, call Susie at 541-589-1522.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets every Sunday at 7 p.m. at Foursquare Church for 12×12 study.


Monday Dec. 28

Posted on December 23rd in Community Calendar

The Burns Lions Club meets every Monday, except holidays, at noon at the Burns Elks Lodge. Those interested in serving the community and visitors are welcome. For more information, call 541-573-4000.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Burns Fire Dept. meets each Monday at the Burns Fire Hall at 7 p.m.

The Hines Volunteer Fire Department meets at the Hines Fire Hall each Monday at 7 p.m. (except the last Monday of the month). Prospective members may contact Fire Chief Bob Spence at 541-573-7477 or 541-573-2251.

Narcotics Anonymous meets each Monday at 10 a.m. in the community room at Saginaw Village, 605 N. Saginaw. For more information, call 541-589-4405.


Tuesday Dec. 29

Posted on December 23rd in Community Calendar

A breast cancer support group meets the fourth Tuesday of each month in the Harney District Hospital conference room from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. For more information, contact Kristen Gregg at 541-573-8614.

The Friskey Fleas 4-H Dog Club meets at 6:30 p.m. each Tuesday in the Memorial Building at the fairgrounds. For more information, call Joanna Corson at 541-573-2241.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Tai Chi for Better Balance with Diane Rapaport is held each Tuesday and Thursday at Harney County Senior and Community Services Center from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. — free.

Boy Scouts meet each Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the LDS Church in Hines. All boys age 11 and above are welcome to participate.

Alcoholics Anonymous holds an open meeting each Tuesday at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord in Burns at 7 p.m.


Battling the blaze

Posted on December 16th in News
Shortly after 9 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 10, Burns and Hines fire departments responded to a report of a structure fire behind US Bank in Burns. Upon arrival, smoke and flames  were already visible in the two-story building, owned by John Mims. The building housed a number of antique items that were unable to be saved. Burns Fire Chief Scott Williamson said the unsafe conditions prevented anyone from entering the building, and the cause of the blaze remains undetermined. An account has been set up at US Bank for donations to help Mims with the clean-up effort. (Photo by RANDY PARKS)

Shortly after 9 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 10, Burns and Hines fire departments responded to a report of a structure fire behind US Bank in Burns. Upon arrival, smoke and flames were already visible in the two-story building, owned by John Mims. The building housed a number of antique items that were unable to be saved. Burns Fire Chief Scott Williamson said the unsafe conditions prevented anyone from entering the building, and the cause of the blaze remains undetermined. An account has been set up at US Bank for donations to help Mims with the clean-up effort.
(Photo by RANDY PARKS)


Herreras named Grand Marshals

Posted on December 16th in News

Taylor Crafts selected to serve as Fair Queen

by Randy Parks
Burns Times-Herald

From L-R: Fair Manager Don Slone, Grand Marshal Ed Herrera, Grand Marshal Reta Herrera, and Fair Queen Taylor Crafts. (Submitted photo)

From L-R: Fair Manager Don Slone, Grand Marshal Ed Herrera, Grand Marshal Reta Herrera, and Fair Queen Taylor Crafts. (Submitted photo)

Ed and Reta Herrera were introduced as the Grand Marshals for the 2016 Harney County Fair, Rodeo, and Race Meet, and Taylor Crafts greeted the crowd as the 2016 Fair Queen at the Harney County Fair Volunteer Appreciation Christmas Party on Sunday, Dec. 13.

Fair Manager Don Slone also announced “Bucking Chutes and Dusty Boots” was chosen as the theme for next year’s fair.

A report on the 2015 fair was presented to those in attendance as follows:

Exhibits

• 163 adults entered 900 Open Class exhibits. 134 youth entered 539 Open Class exhibits. 221 4-H and FFA Youth entered 1,029 exhibits.

Fairgrounds events

• There were 200 youth events with 9,530 people attending. This is 36 more youth events, and 1,931 more people than in 2014.

• There were 238 public events with 27,846 people attending. This is 36 more events and 1,175 more people attending than in 2014.

• There were 40 private events with 1,335 people attending. This is six fewer events and 356 fewer people attending than in 2014.

• All of this was a total of 478 events with 38,711 people attending. That is 66 more events and 2,733 more people than in 2014.

Volunteers

• There were 557 volunteers and sponsors working directly for the Fair Board in 2015. This is 144 fewer volunteers than in 2014.

• Estimated hours by those volunteers were 8,257 or equivalent to 3.9 full-time employees.

• At a minimum wage, those volunteer hours would cost $76,250.

Financial statistics

• The expense of the 2015 fair was $192,521. The income of the 2014 fair was $175,000.

• The estimated gross dollars earned by 24 community organizations during the fair is $714,920 or $228,172 more than in 2014. This is four times what the fair revenue was.

• The 4-H and FFA auction alone grossed $410,615, or $135,529 more than in 2014.

• The estimated gross dollars generated by community organizations at the fairgrounds during the off season was $107,278 or $1,038 fewer than in 2014.

• The economic impact of the 2015 Fair to Harney County is $6.674 million.


by Samantha White
Burns Times-Herald

Jan Reed, owner, stands in front of her new store at 353 W. Monroe. (Photo by SAMANTHA WHITE)

Jan Reed, owner, stands in front of her new store at 353 W. Monroe. (Photo by SAMANTHA WHITE)

When you open the door to Horseshoe Antiques, owner, Jan Reed, greets you with a warm smile and invites you to peruse the shop’s inventory of collectibles and “vintage things.”

Located at 353 W. Monroe St. in Burns, Horseshoe Antiques offers a trove of treasures, including vintage furniture, home decor, kitchen items, glassware, western items, and linens. With the holidays hastily approaching, the store is currently filled with Christmas collectibles, including gifts, bulbs and decorations. Additionally, Reed recently added Persian rugs to the inventory.

Reed, who moved to Harney County from Vancouver, Wash., has been collecting antiques since she was about 25. She said she started by salvaging the sentimental items that her mother attempted to toss while cleaning out the closets, and she ended up accumulating antiques from various family members.

“I always liked the old things,” Reed said. “I was the kind that would keep it, so I got stuff from aunts and cousins. They would call me up and give it to me.”

Reed has been in the antique business for about 20 years. She had an antique space in a mall in Camas, Wash., for five years and conducted estate and garage sales before and during that time. She also had a successful career in banking.

Although she’s a new resident, Reed has roots in Harney County. In fact, her grandparents, Clifford “Teddy” and Julia Reed, were early pioneers in the area. Clifford and his brother co-owned Reed Brothers Pharmacy.

Reed’s father, Richard, and his siblings, Homer, Wally, and Louell, were all born in the area.

Being a jazz musician, Richard moved to Portland to continue his music career.

However, Reed visited Harney County frequently, bringing her father to town for Pioneer Day celebrations and his class reunions. She and her sister also attended the Hines Junket annually.

“Pretty soon, I knew that when I retired [from banking] I wanted to come here, and I did,” Reed explained, adding that it only took her one day to sell her condominium in Vancouver.

Reed bought a house in Hines, and as she was unpacking her things, she came to the conclusion that she needed to get rid of some stuff.

“A lot of it had come from my shop and wasn’t of personal, sentimental value, so that kind of got the ball started,” Reed said regarding her decision to open a shop in Burns.

She started looking around for a space to rent and found a vacant building owned by Mike and Corinne Huseby. Reed met the Husebys when she stayed at the Sage Country Inn, the couple’s bed and breakfast.

“They are such good people. I saw the ‘for rent’ sign and rented the next day,” Reed said. “Everything just fell into line.”

Reed said business has been good so far, adding that the store’s furniture has been very popular. In fact, Reed said she’s looking to buy furniture for her shop, and people can stop by to tell her what they have.

She added that customers can also list items that they’d like to purchase, and she’ll go on “field trips” to find them. In addition to traveling, Reed said she plans to fulfill customers’ “wish lists” by looking locally.

While she’s out “hunting for treasures,” Reed said her son, Jarrett Baker, will help hold down the shop. She hired an additional part-time employee to help out, as well.

Reed added that she appreciates the warm reception that she’s received from the community, and she’s looking forward to attracting tourists this summer.

Horseshoe Antiques is open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Hilanders defeat Ontario, Vale

Posted on December 16th in Sports

by Randy Parks
Burns Times-Herald

Trace Tiller of Burns puts up a shot. (Photo by RANDY PARKS)

Trace Tiller of Burns puts up a shot. (Photo by RANDY PARKS)

Trace Tiller scored 21 points to lead the Burns Hilanders to a 48-39 nonconference win over Ontario on Tuesday, Dec. 8, at Burns High School.

Scott Davies added eight points for the Hilanders, and Ty Wayne Reid chipped in with seven.

Davies scored all of his points in the first quarter, helping Burns take an 11-7 lead after the first eight minutes.

The Hilanders built a 19-10 lead midway through the second period, but the Tigers went on a 7-0 run, and the teams went into halftime with Burns up 21-19.

After Ontario opened up the third quarter with another 7-0 run, Tiller buried a 3-pointer to bring Burns back to within two. With the Tigers up 32-31 late in the period, Zach McDonald hit back-to-back 3-pointers, and Tiller added a pair of free throws to put Burns ahead 39-32 headed into the final quarter.

Burns never trailed in the fourth quarter, and shut out Ontario over the final four minutes of the game to pick up the win.

          1     2     3     4     Final

Ont    7   12    13    7        39

Bur   11  10    18    9        48

•••

On Friday, Dec. 11, the Hilanders traveled to Vale for a nonconference game with the Vikings.

The Hilanders downed Vale 54-35.

The following day, Burns hosted Baker, and it was the Bulldogs coming out on top 50-41.

The Hilanders host Weston-McEwen on Saturday, Dec. 19, and Jordan Valley on Tuesday, Dec. 22.


Francis Norman Sitz 1917-2015

Posted on December 16th in Obituaries

 

OBIT Sitz WEBFrancis Norman Sitz, 98, passed away Dec. 9 in Boise, Idaho.

F. Norman Sitz was born May 24, 1917, in Drewsey to John Lewis and Georgia Sitz. He grew up working hard on the family ranch. When the Great Depression came and his father died, he and his siblings worked years to pay off the ranch debt.

He herded sheep every summer near Strawberry Mountain, ran a trap line before school in the winter, and shared all the chores of a cattle ranch. He graduated from Burns High School at age 15, then continued ranching and trapping.

He managed to buy a Piper Cub, which he flew all over Eastern Oregon, and he often landed in the sagebrush to make urgent repairs before taking off again.

He went to Oregon State University, studying agriculture, but quit after a year, saying he already knew how to raise chickens.

He worked for the Harney County extension agency, then later joined the Army officer training program just before WWII. He was at the top of his Fort Lewis graduating class in the IQ test and obstacle course, and was offered a position on General Eisenhower’s staff upon graduation, but instead chose to stay with his men from Kentucky and Tennessee in the 959th Artillery of the 19th Army.

He landed on Omaha Beach June 24, 1944, and led his “Long Tom” self-propelled howitzer 110s for 800 miles through France, Belgium, Holland, and Germany. They were often behind enemy lines, as they supported the infantry and dueled with the deadly German 88 artillery. He directed the first Allied artillery fired into German soil, and was decorated for winning a duel with 10 German guns against his three. He was a “mayor” of a large area in Germany after the Armistice.

He returned to Harney County and married Ellen Catterson. In 1947, they honeymooned by taking a jeep and trailer up the Alcan Highway, and settled in Anchorage, Ala., where he built their log cabin and worked as a carpenter. After Ellen said she was leaving the “!!#**#! cold,” they returned to Harney County, and he began his lifelong career as a cattleman, first in Burns, then in Ontario. At various times, he owned and/or managed the sale yards in Weiser, Idaho, Ontario, and Baker. The Ontario Livestock Commission Company had the 10th largest volume of cattle sales in the U.S. during the years he managed it.

He lived in the era of cattlemen who did million-dollar deals on a handshake, and every man’s word was good. He was a shrewd cattleman, known for his honesty and integrity. Every evening, his phone rang constantly with ranchers seeking advice. He had a soft spot for ranch hands/cowboys down on their luck and helped out hundreds over his career.

He was also an unbeatable card player and won so consistently that he was politely banned from many local card games. He started his career as a cattleman by playing poker in a local game for several days until he made enough to buy his first herd.

Norman and Ellen raised four children in Ontario, and he taught some of them how to stealthily catch trout in small desert and mountain streams. He semi-retired in the 1970s, and began successfully trading in cattle futures for many years.

He took up golf, despite his feeling that the grass could be better used for raising cattle. Although he had the worst golf swing in history, he gradually managed to get down to a single-digit handicap. He also drove the mail truck on his route from Ontario to Drewsey.

Ellen passed away in 2003. Norman lived at his home until the very last. Because of severe eyesight problems and other age-related issues, he was wonderfully cared for during the last 13 years by his daughter, Nancy/Yasha.

Norman remained mentally sharp and was enthusiastic about being alive every day. He continued to be a master of the daily Jumble.

He died from complications of an elbow fracture sustained on his daily walk.

Norman is survived by his daughters, Nancy/Yasha Sitz of Boise, and Laura Williams of Juntura; sons, John Sitz of Ontario, and Dr. Norman Sitz of Pendleton; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Funeral and graveside services were held Dec. 12 in Ontario. Remembrances may be sent to the family at www.lienkaemperthomason.com


Whaddya Think?

Which is your favorite Sunday afternoon activity?
  • Watching football (35%)
  • Taking a walk/drive (20%)
  • Napping (18%)
  • Reading (14%)
  • Baking (9%)
  • Playing family games (4%)

85 total vote(s)

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