Tuesday November 18

Posted on November 12th in Community Calendar

Hines Common Council meets at 6:30 p.m. at Hines City Hall. This will be the only council meeting for the month of November.

The American Legion Harney County Post #63 meets at 63 W. “C” Street the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m.

Harney County Watershed Council meets the third Tuesday of each month at the EOARC (Section 5) on Hwy. 205 in the conference room at 5:30 p.m.

Sylvia Rebekah Lodge meets the first and third Tuesday of each month at the I.O.O.F. Hall, 348 N. Broadway, at 6:30 p.m.

The Chamber Orchestra meets the first and third Tuesday of each month in the Burns High School Band Room, 1100 Oregon Avenue, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. with Ken Peckham directing, September through November and January through March.

Fall open enrollment for Medicare Drug plans and Advantage Healthplans. Trained SHIBA (Senior Health Insurance Assistance Program) will be at the Senior Center, 17 S. Alder, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. to help you compare your plans. Call 541-573-6024 for appointments.

Harney Basin Writers meets each Tuesday from noon until 4 p.m. in room 302 of the former Lincoln School, corner of A Street and Court Ave. in Burns. Elevator on the south side. Quiet writing time until 2 p.m., then readings begin. Adults of any writing style are welcome to attend.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance Program (SHIBA) trained volunteers will be at the Harney County Senior Center each Tuesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call the senior center at 541-573-6024.

Tai Chi for Better Balance with Diane Rapaport is held each Tuesday and Thursday at Harney County Senior and Community Services Center from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. — free.

 


Award recognizes good citizens

by Samantha White
Burns Times-Herald

Garrett Goss was one of the first six students who were selected for the Scotty Legends award. As part of the honor, students have the opportunity to paint their handprints on the wall near the entrance of the Hines Middle School gym. (Photo by SAMANTHA WHITE)

Garrett Goss was one of the first six students who were selected for the Scotty Legends award. As part of the honor, students have the opportunity to paint their handprints on the wall near the entrance of the Hines Middle School gym. (Photo by SAMANTHA WHITE)

Hines Middle School (HMS), home of the Scotties, is on a mission to celebrate students who exemplify citizenship, honor, ethics, and morals with a new award called, “Scotty Legends.”

Webster’s New World Dictionary defines a “legend” as both “a notable person whose deeds or exploits are much talked about in his or her own time” and “a story handed down for generations among a people and popularly believed to have a historical basis…”

Both of these definitions seem to fit HMS Principal Jerry Mayes’ expectations for the lasting significance of the honor.

About the award

Mayes said students already earn awards for their achievements in athletics, academics and attendance, but HMS staff also wanted to recognize students for being “good all-around citizens.”

Mayes said the staff thought there should be an award for students who display honesty, honor, integrity, and “common manners” every day, “from the time they come in, to the time they leave,” not because it’s expected of them, but because “it’s part of their nature.” Mayes said these are the students who will grow up to be “the untold heroes who keep pretty much the rest of the populous in check” because they’re “natural leaders” who aren’t influenced by “the group mentality.”

During an assembly held Monday, Oct. 27, Garrett Goss, Lizet Camacho, Lily Taylor, Mick Winn, Jessy York and Madison Caldwell were introduced as the first group of Scotty Legends.

 

The selection process

Scotty Legends are selected and agreed upon by all HMS staff, including teachers, paraprofessionals and administrators.

“It has to be unanimously decided upon,” Mayes explained.

He said staff evaluate how students treat each other, act when they think no one is watching, and behave when “everyone else is griping.” Student behavior is not only observed during class, but also between classes, during lunch and recess, and before school starts in the morning.

Mayes said new nominations will be considered  monthly, but staff will not be required to select a specific number of students.

“It depends on what we agree upon that month,” Mayes said, explaining that the award must be earned “across the board.”

Mayes said six Scotty Legends were selected this month, but next month there may be 10, or there may only be 1, or there may not be any. He said he doesn’t want staff members to feel like they have to fill a quota.

 

A lasting legacy

Scotty Legends are recognized during an assembly with a certificate and a wooden plaque, which is made by the HMS woodshop teacher. The Legends also get their picture taken, and the photos are displayed in the trophy case for the remainder of the month. However, the most enduring element of the award is the opportunity for students to add their handprints to the wall near the gym entrance.

“The plaques and certificates go home, the pictures come down, but the handprints stay,” Mayes said, adding that they’re painted in an area that’s visible to the public, and they’ll remain there for years to come.

Ann Choate, “the staff calligrapher,” will label the handprints with the corresponding students’ names.

Mayes, who joined the HMS staff at the start of the school year, said a similar program was implemented at the school where he worked before. At one point, Mayes’ previous school considered painting over the older prints to make room for new nominees, but the former students’ parents and grandparents prevented the painting because they wanted the younger siblings and cousins to be inspired by their older relatives’ accomplishments.

“We want students to look up at those handprints and for them to mean something,” Mayes said, explaining that he wants the Scotty Legends to be recognized as leaders and for the award to be something that students strive to attain.

 

An exceptional school

Mayes, who’s been in the education field for almost 35 years, said he’s very pleased with the students at HMS.

He said they have a very caring attitude, demonstrate positive relationships, and are polite to the teaching staff and each other.

“I haven’t seen nearly as much of that in other schools,” he said.


Council considers cameras

Posted on November 5th in News

Hines police, fire respond to rollover

by Steve Howe
Burns Times-Herald

The Hines Common Council met for its regular meeting Tuesday, Oct. 28. During the meeting, the council discussed the potential installation of security cameras on city buildings.

Hines Police Chief Ryan DeLange said most businesses have cameras, and that he thinks it would be a “great tool” for law enforcement in preventing and solving crimes.

“We should have cameras. There’s no doubt,” said DeLange.

City Administrator Joan Davies asked if DeLange thought the presence of the cameras would be a deterrent to crimes.

“If they (criminals) see that camera, a lot of times, they’re going to change their minds about stealing,” DeLange responded.

He suggested that one camera be placed just outside the front door of city hall, and one over the counter inside. Other sites were also discussed, and various camera systems were considered.

•••

In his department report, DeLange told the council that things have slowed down, but that there continue to be a lot of thefts, including gas drive-offs. He said that the department responded to the fatal rollover accident on 47 Road that occurred Oct. 28.

DeLange also said he has been holding classes at Harney District Hospital to teach employees how to recognize signs of drug use.

•••

Superintendent of Public Works Pedro Zabala said that his department has been busy picking up leaves and pine needles for the past two weeks.

He said that a water usage report for the city indicated that the level of use has not changed greatly in the past few years.

•••

Hines Volunteer Fire Department (HVFD) Chief Bob Spence was not present at the meeting, but Davies gave his report.

Spence reported that HVFD responded to a flue fire on Oct. 20 on North Roanoke, and to the fatal rollover accident on 47 Road Oct. 28.

He said that the department helped maintain safety at the bonfire for Red Ribbon Week at the fairgrounds, and would be assisting in blocking off Broadway Avenue in Burns for the Halloween parade.

Six HVFD members recently participated in a 16-hour training for responding to hazardous material situations, or terrorism attacks. A full-scale exercise was scheduled for the weekend with the Burns Fire Department, law enforcement, the Oregon Department of Transportation, public works, and Oregon Hazmat Team 14.

•••

In her report, Davies told the council that the cans and bottles fund for park beautification was up to $2,565.37.

Davies said that the council members had been invited by Chris Siegner, director of Symmetry Care, to a Community Action Team meeting to discuss medical marijuana concerns Nov. 18 at noon. Other local officials and law enforcement were also invited.

Davies reported that the city has been working with Ferguson Engineering to develop a plan for laying a drainage pipe in the vicinity of the southern end of Saginaw Avenue. She said that landowners will need to be contacted regarding easements before moving forward with the project.

•••

The council was given a brief update on the project to “bring home to Harney County” a train engine from the historic Oregon & Northwestern Railroad, along with a flat car, to be displayed in Hines Park. Davies said that the group is working on applying for grants and organizing a fundraising dinner.

Councilor Dick Baird suggested that there be a donation box placed in the park with the engine and car to help cover any future maintenance expenses.

•••

In other business, the council:

• approved business applications for Griller’s Choice and My Shipping Marketplace;

• voted to donate $100 to the Kids Club of Harney County, and $150 to the Harney County Senior Center meal program;

• approved sending Officer Casey Held to a free “close quarters” training offered by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training;

• approved accounts payable for Oct. 14 and Oct. 28 in the amounts of $83,425.80 and $74,756.56, respectively.

The last two meetings of the year for the Hines Common Council will be held Nov. 18 and Dec. 16 at 6:30 p.m. at Hines City Hall.


Mustangs down Badgers 60-14

Posted on November 5th in Sports

by Randy Parks
Burns Times-Herald

The Mustangs’ David Steeves stiff-arms Seth Dixon of Powder Valley as he picks up yardage in Crane’s 60-14 win. (Photo by RANDY PARKS)

The Mustangs’ David Steeves stiff-arms Seth Dixon of Powder Valley as he picks up yardage in Crane’s 60-14 win. (Photo by RANDY PARKS)

The Crane Mustangs improved to 7-2 and advanced to the first round of the OSAA 1A state football playoffs with a 60-14 win over Powder Valley on Friday, Oct. 31.

Crane took control of the game early, as they stopped the Badgers on their first drive, blocked the punt and took over at the Powder Valley 21. After three runs by Austin Roath, Jack Bentz threw a 1-yard scoring pass to Matt Witzel, and the 2-point conversion pass to Roath,to give Crane an 8-0 lead.

Roath added a 6-yard touchdown run on Crane’s next possession to give the Mustangs a 14-0 lead with 4:45 left in the first quarter.

The Badgers’ Seth Dixon broke free for a 66-yard gain, and then scored on a 2-yard run to cut the Mustangs’ lead to 14-6.

Crane went up 22-6 on a 33-yard touchdown pass from Bentz to Travis Landon and a 2-point conversion run by David Steeves.

Crane extended their lead to 44-6 with three scores in the second quarter. Bentz connected with Landon on a 27-yard touchdown pass, Roath returned an interception 26 yards for a score, and Steeves added a 20-yard touchdown run.

On the first offensive play of the second half, Bentz raced to the end zone from 46 yards out, and the Mustangs went up 52-6.

Steeves scored the final TD for Crane on a 7-yard run with 6:56 left in the third quarter.

Powder Valley scored their second touchdown of the game on 15-yard pass from Dixon to Colton Ficek late in the third quarter, and neither team threatened again.

The Mustangs rushed for 236 yards, led by Roath with 78 yards on 13 carries.

Bentz completed eight of 13 passes for 132 yards and two touchdowns.

The Crane defense also played well, holding the Badgers to 118 rushing yards, and allowing only four pass completions on 17 attempts for 46 yards, with two interceptions.

 

PV       6     0     0    8    14

Cra    22    22   16   0    60

 

The Mustangs will host Triangle Lake (5-3) at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8.


OBIT—WebbMichael Aaron Webb, 18, of Burns, passed away Oct. 28.

Michael was born Feb. 10, 1996, in Apple Valley, Calif., the second youngest of six children. Michael lived in Medford for the first few years of his life before the family moved to Burns in 2004, where his father became the pastor of the First Pentecostal Church.

He was home schooled for a majority of the time, however, his senior year of high school was spent attending Burns High School. Michael loved video games, listening to music, playing basketball and much more. However, he loved his family and friends more than anything.

Michael is survived by his parents, Mark and Maria Webb of Burns; brothers, Dean and Matthew of Burns, and Nathan of Colorado Springs, Colo.; sister, Terrynn Cook of Colorado Springs, Colo.; as well as grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, nephews, nieces, and many friends.

He was preceded in death by his maternal grandmother, Beatriz Vega; paternal grandfather, Roy Webb; and sister, Brianna Webb.

A funeral service was held Nov. 1 at the Harney County Church of the Nazarene in Hines.

Condolences may be sent to Mark and Maria Webb, 862 N. Egan, Burns, OR 97720.

 


This is a notice to all our family and friends that Al Bonson passed away Nov. 2. A Celebration of Life service will be held at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8, at the Harney County Fairgrounds. All are welcome to come celebrate his life with the family.

 


Wednesday November 5

Posted on November 5th in Community Calendar

Harney County Court meets the first and third Wednesday of each month at the Harney County Courthouse, 450 North Buena Vista, at 10 a.m.

The Harney County Community Response Team (CRT) meets the first Wednesday of every month from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Community Center, 484 N. Broadway. The CRT consists of anyone interested in what is going on in the county as it relates to business and industry. County, city and tribal leaders provide general information to the public regarding xisting programs and recruitment efforts.

Burns Elks Lodge, 118 N. Broadway, meets the first and third Wednesday of each month at 7:30 p.m.

Christmas Cookie Prevention, a women’s fitness group will be held Wednesdays, through Dec 17 at Faith Baptist Church, 777 Saginaw in Hines. A beginners fitness class will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. and a moderate intensity class from 6:05 p.m. to 6:25 p.m. The classes are free and everyone is welcome. For more information, contact Kara Nelson 541-589-3773.

Storytime for preschoolers is scheduled at the Harney County Library, 80 W. D St., each Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Contact the Harney County Library for more information, 541-573 6670.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets each Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns.

ALANON, a support group for friends and families of alcoholics, meets each Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns. Please use the back door on the south side of the building. All interested are welcome.

 


Thursday November 6

Posted on November 5th in Community Calendar

Burns Butte Sportsmen’s Club meets the first Thursday of each month at the State Office Building, 809 W. Jackson, at 7 p.m. Fall open enrollment for Medicare Drug plans and Advantage Healthplans. Trained SHIBA (Senior Health Insurance Assistance Program) will be at the Senior Center, 17 S. Alder, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. to help you compare your plans. Call 541-573-6024 for appointments.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Kiwanis Club of Burns-Hines meets for a no-host luncheon at noon each Thursday at Bella Java, 314 N. Broadway in Burns.

A Women’s AA meeting is held every Thursday at noon at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets at noon each Thursday at Hines City Hall, 101 E. Barnes. Call 541-573-2896.

Tai Chi for Better Balance with Diane Rapaport is held each Tuesday and Thursday at Harney County Senior and Community Services Center from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. — free.


Friday November 7

Posted on November 5th in Community Calendar

Oregon Old Time Fiddlers, District 9, meets the first, third and fourth Friday of each month. Call Micky at 541-573-2515 for time and place.

A recovery group, “Celebrate Recovery,” meets each Friday at the Harney County Church of the Nazarene, 311 Roe Davis Ave. in Hines. Dinner is served at 5:30 p.m. The main meeting is held at 6 p.m. and small group sessions are at 7 p.m. For more information, call 541-573-7100.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets each Friday at Symmetry Care at 5 p.m.


Saturday November 8

Posted on November 5th in Community Calendar

The Harney County Radio Association meets every second Saturday of the month at 10 a.m. in the basement meeting room of the Harney County Courthouse. All amateur radio operators and interested parties are welcome.

To make sure everyone has an opportunity to get the flu shot, HDH Family Care will be offering them during Saturday Clinics! Stop by between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 8, to get yours. For more information, call HDH Family Care at 541-573-2074. 


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