Tuesday October 14

Posted on October 8th in Community Calendar

Harney County Fair Board meets the second Tuesday of each month in the Hibbard Building at the Harney County Fairgrounds at 7 p.m.

The Harney County Library Foundation board of directors meets the second Tuesday of each month at the library at 5:30 p.m. The meetings are open to the public. For more information, call 541-573-7339.

Disabilities Services Advisory Council for Harney County meets the second Tuesday of each month at the state office building, 809 W. Jackson, at 1:30 p.m.

Symmetry Care Advisory Committee meets the second Tuesday of each month at Symmetry Care, 53 W. Washington, at 1:30 p.m.

The American Legion Auxiliary meets the second Tuesday of each month at 63 W. “C” Street at 2 p.m.

The Harney County Chamber Music Society meets the second and fourth Tuesday, September-November and January-March. The choir meets in the Burns High School band room from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. with Marianne Andrews directing. Singers ages 13-up are welcome.

The Harney County School District No. 3 board of directors meets at the District Office, 550 N. Court, the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m.

Hines Common Council meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at Hines City Hall, 101 E. Barnes, at 6:30 p.m.

Overeaters Anonymous meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 5 p.m. in the Harney District Hospital Annex (downstairs in cafeteria area). For more information, call Carol at 541-589-1272.

Harney Basin Writers meets each Tuesday from noon until 4 p.m. in room 302 of the former Lincoln School, corner of A Street and Court Ave. in Burns. Elevator on the south side. Quiet writing time until 2 p.m., then readings begin. Adults of any writing style are welcome to attend.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance Program (SHIBA) trained volunteers will be at the Harney County Senior Center each Tuesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call the senior center at 541-573-6024.

Tai Chi for Better Balance with Diane Rapaport is held each Tuesday and Thursday at Harney County Senior and Community Services Center from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. — free.

Boy Scouts meet each Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the LDS Church in Hines. All boys age 11 and above are welcome to participate.

Alcoholics Anonymous holds an open meeting each Tuesday at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord in Burns at 7 p.m.


Water meters to be replaced or repaired

by Steve Howe
Burns Times-Herald

The Hines Common Council met for its regular meeting Tuesday, Sept. 23. During the meeting, the council heard from those involved in a group seeking to “bring home” a train engine and caboose that ran on the historic Oregon & Northwestern (O&NW) railroad in Hines, as well as a flatbed car, to put on display at Hines Park.

A subsidiary of the Edward Hines Lumber Company, O&NW hauled logs, lumber (and occasionally livestock) between Hines and Seneca from 1929 until 1984.

The project committee, organized by Councilor Hilda Allison, is seeking to raise the necessary funds to purchase the No. 4 O&NW engine and a flatbed car from the Western Pacific Railroad Museum in Portola, Calif., (just northwest of Reno, Nev.) and transport them here to be placed permanently in Hines Park. Wayne Monger, co-author of Images of Rail: Oregon & Northwestern Railroad, is considering donating a refurbished, 100-year-old O&NW caboose pending the acquisition of the No. 4 engine.

Monica Newkirk, Mayor Nikki Morgan, and City Administrator Joan Davies presented information from the group’s recent meeting.

Newkirk reported that the engine would cost around $16,000, and would need to be purchased within the year, as it is slated to be scrapped. She said that costs for transporting the engine would come to around $25,000.

Morgan said that the flatbed car is $1,000, and would need refurbishment of its redwood decking. She said that it could be used as a stage for performances in the park. Morgan added that the requirements to have the train engine and cars displayed include a prepared ground surface, new railroad ties and track, and a roof over the engine.

Newkirk said that they will aim to raise $50,000 – $60,000 in total.

Davies said that they are considering placement on the southern edge of the main park, in a dirt area where it would not take away any grass or play area. Davies also noted that the city’s insurance carrier had been consulted, and that there would be no extra cost to the city with the addition of the train engine and cars to the city park.

Morgan also reported that the group includes a high school student, Hannah Rohwer, who will be working on grant-writing and publicity as part of her senior project. She said that Rohwer has met with Desert Historic Theatre owner Tiny Petersen about showing a short film about the train and the mill, and possibly tying it in with a dinner event as a fundraiser.

Councilors Dick Baird and Dick Anderson raised concerns about extra work and maintenance expenses for the city once the train engine and cars were placed in the city park. A discussion ensued about the project in terms of its historical value to the community, as well as tourism.

“The businesses…will benefit when people come through here,” said Morgan.

“We’ll be on the map for those railroad enthusiasts,” she added.

Allison asked if there was any public process that needed to happen before the group started fundraising. Anderson suggested that the city send out a questionnaire with the water bill to gauge public opinion on the matter. Morgan said that time was limited, and it would have to be sent out with next month’s bills.

•••

Hines Volunteer Fire Department (HVFD) Chief Bob Spence reported that there had been only two calls since the last council meeting one month ago. He also said that HVFD continues to participate in joint training activities with Burns Fire Department and the Burns Tribal Fire Department.

Spence said although there had been some rain, there will need to be more before the ban can be lifted for burn barrels.

•••

Superintendent of Public Works Pedro Zabala said 10 water meters were replaced or repaired, and 30 are currently in progress.

The council voted to approve Resolution No. 2192, transferring $2,100 from the contingency fund to pay for water meter repairs and replacements.

•••

Hines Police Chief Ryan DeLange was absent from the meeting, as he was attending a training session. Davies delivered his report, which noted that there have been two house burglaries as of late, and that Officer Casey Held has been busy working with the joint drug task-force team.

•••

Davies reported that there was $1,736.37 in the cans and bottles fund for the park.

She read aloud a letter from a resident, thanking the city for cleaning the alley behind her house.

Davies said a resident contacted her regarding the police “cracking down” on illegal use of golf carts and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) on city streets. The resident heard that John Day passed an ordinance allowing golf carts. Davies said she checked into that city’s ordinance, and although it makes an allowance for ATVs (i.e., for plowing snow), it does not allow golf carts.

“I believe your position is that we won’t [allow golf carts] either,” Davies said, addressing the councilors. She also noted that it was illegal anyway, and the city couldn’t make allowances for state highways.

•••

In other business, the council:

• voted to award contracts for crack sealing and a slurry seal for Circle Drive to TopLoc (Councilor Ron Williams abstained from both votes, as he was a contractor that bid on the projects).

• approved accounts payable in the amount of $32,757.81;

• approved per diem for Davies to attend the League of Oregon Cities meeting in Eugene, Sept. 25-27;

• approved mileage expense for Davies and city treasurer Rachel Robinson to attend the Chaves Consulting conference in Baker City Oct. 8.


On Thursday and Friday, Sept. 25-26, members of the community gathered at the Burns Cemetery to plant trees in memory of Josh Shepherd. The 128 trees, blue spruce and Ponderosa pine, were donated by Kraemer’s Nursery of Mount Angel, where Shepherd was employed before passing away from injuries suffered in a traffic accident last May. The trees were planted in two rows to form a windbreak along the west side of the cemetery. (Photo by RANDY PARKS)

On Thursday and Friday, Sept. 25-26, members of the community gathered at the Burns Cemetery to plant trees in memory of Josh Shepherd. The 128 trees, blue spruce and Ponderosa pine, were donated by Kraemer’s Nursery of Mount Angel, where Shepherd was employed before passing away from injuries suffered in a traffic accident last May. The trees were planted in two rows to form a windbreak along the west side of the cemetery. (Photo by RANDY PARKS)

Shepherd’s wife, Jennifer, his father, Jim Shepherd and son, Liam, help with the planting of trees. (submitted photo)

Shepherd’s wife, Jennifer, his father, Jim Shepherd, and son, Liam, help with the planting of trees. (Submitted photo)


Tegan Strickland bumps a serve ahead to teammate. (Photo by STEVE HOWE)

Tegan Strickland bumps a serve ahead to teammate. (Photo by STEVE HOWE)

The Crane varsity volleyball team defeated Prairie City for the fourth time in as many meetings this season, downing the Panthers in five sets on Friday, Sept. 26.

The Mustangs won the first two sets, 25-15, 25-17, and then lost the next two, 23-25, 17-25, setting up a fifth and deciding set, which Crane won 15-12.

“Wow, it was a close game. We played hot and cold through all the games,” Crane coach Mandi Dowell said. “Gaining the lead by six or seven points and then giving it back to them. It was our fourth time playing Prairie City, and I think maybe it’s hard to continue defeating a team so many times.”

The Crane JV team also won, defeating Prairie City in three sets, 21-25, 25-19, 15-12.

The Mustangs hosted McDermitt, Nev. on Tuesday, Sept. 30. Results of the match were not available by press time.

Crane’s next match is on the road, as they travel to Jordan Valley Friday, Oct. 3. The match is set to start at 3 p.m. (Pacific Time).


Zora E. Retherford 1916-2014

Posted on October 1st in Obituaries

OBIT Retherford webZora E. Retherford, 97, passed away Sept. 10 at Ashley Manor.

Zora was born Dec. 18, 1916, in Banks to Joseph Lloyd Berry and Harriet Margaret Aydelott Berry.

Zora was the oldest of six children born to Joseph and Harriet, and she also had a half-brother that was older.

Zora grew up in the Willamette Valley, and as a child, worked in hop yards, peach orchards, and always helped with big vegetable gardens grown by her parents to feed their family. Even though they lived through the depression, they never felt deprived.

Zora attended Hopville grade school and finished eighth grade with the highest state average in Polk County, 97 percent. Zora graduated from Independence High School in 1935 as the valedictorian of her class. Zora received a state scholarship to Oregon State College and graduated in 1939 from the school of home economics with a bachelor of science degree. Her first teaching certificate was for junior high, high school and junior college. Zora loved school and would have gone to school all her life if she could have. She attended summer school and took correspondent courses to advance her teaching certificate.

Zora took her first teaching job in the fall of 1939 at Crane. Being from the green Willamette Valley, when she arrived in Crane she thought she’d died and gone to hell, the sagebrush and dust just about did her in, and her nose dripped for the next 75 years. Zora soon fell in love with the people in Harney County, and was glad to call it home.

Zora married Kenneth W. Retherford June 10, 1940 in Crane, and they were married 50-plus years. They had three children, Linda May, Kenneth Dale and Susan Gail.

Zora taught school for 24 years. She taught in Crane, Perrydale, John Day and Burns. While in Perrydale, she started the first school lunch program and it was very successful. In her career as a teacher, she taught home economics, science, girls P.E., world history, geography, typing I, bookkeeping, English, and fifth and sixth grade classes. One of her favorite classes was boys home economics in junior high. During her teaching career, Zora was also active in many organizations: BPW (Business and Professional Women), OEA (Oregon Education Association), Delta Kappa Gamma, 4-H, Brownies, and taught FHA (Future Homemakers of America).

After retiring, Zora and husband, Ken, traveled a lot. They went on a cruise to Alaska, they went to Hawaii, they were snowbirds in the winter months, going to Mexico and Arizona in their motor home. They also went to Oklahoma, where Ken’s family was from. That was Ken’s last trip, as he passed away in 1991.

After Ken’s passing, Zora wanted to return to the Willamette Valley to spend time with her brothers and sisters. So, Zora moved into a mobile home park in Monmouth, where her two sisters lived. They had a great time together for the next seven or eight years. When they had also passed, Zora wanted to return home to Harney County for the rest of her years.

Zora moved into The Aspens, but soon became bored. She needed dirt to dig in. Everywhere Zora lived was always covered with flowers and gardens. There was no dirt to dig in or plant anything at The Aspens. In 2000, at the age of 84, Zora and her daughter, Sue, bought a 102-year-old house on the hill by the library. For the next eight to nine years, Zora enjoyed fixing up the beautiful house and yard. In 2001, she received the beautification award from the Sunrise Garden Club. There was a lot of work done on the house and yard, but it was very rewarding and fun for Zora. At the age of 90-plus, there was a party to celebrate the house work (the upstairs had finally been finished after 109 years), and an early birthday for Zora.

Zora enjoyed the house and yard, but her dementia was taking its toll, so she had to move to Dutch Apple. She was there a year or so and they closed, so she then moved to Ashley Manor, where she lived until her passing.

Zora loved her family most of all, and spent a lot of time with her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Zora is survived by son, Kenneth, and wife, Randy; daughter, Sue, and husband, Tiny; brother, Larry, and wife, Jan; grandchildren, J.D. Tschunko, and wife, Lisa, Michelle Tye and husband, Steve, Sheree Retherford, Crystal Fretwell and husband, Kenny; great-grandchildren, Caden Tschunko, Amber and Stevie Tye, Jordie Collingwood, Ledger Tye, Hailey Vinson, Leland and Naomi Fretwell; and numerous nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Joseph and Harriet; half-brother, Lionel; sisters, Ella and Marilyn; brothers, George and Dale; husband, Kenneth; and daughter, Linda.

A Celebration of Life for Zora was held Saturday, Sept. 27. Donations in her memory may be made to the Sunrise Garden Club.


OBIT UgaldebwAdolpho David Ugalde, 84, passed away of natural causes Sept. 7 at his home in McDermitt, Nev.

Adolpho was born March 22, 1930, in Winnemucca, Nev.

He was the eighth of eight children born to Juan Antonio Ugalde and Paula Maria Erquiaga Ugalde.  He started school in Kings River Valley at the Nine Mile Ranch and completed the eighth grade in Orovada, Nev. He lived at the Buffalo Ranch with his Tia and Tio while he was in school. He worked at the Quinn River Ranch and at home at the Nine Mile Ranch until he went to serve in Korea from Sept. 19, 1951, to June 18, 1953, where he earned the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, National Defense, Rifleman Cross, and Infantry medals.

Adolpho came home from Korea and worked for numerous ranches throughout Nevada and Oregon. He met the love of his life, Elsie, and they were married on March 21, 1960. They enjoyed 48 years together. When Adolpho married Elsie, he became the father of her three children, Connie, Ken and Dave. Adolpho loved his new family very much. On Aug. 1, 1961 his son, Kap, was born.

Adolpho worked on many ranches from Paradise Valley, Nev. to Frenchglen. He was known for making some of the finest bridle horses in the country, and was often referred to as “The Prince A Horseback.”

In 1983, he went to work for McDermitt Mine, living in McDermitt, Nev. Then he went to work for Amax mine, where he worked until his retirement in 1995.

Adolpho loved branding calves, fishing, and spending time with his kids, grandchildren, and many friends. We will all cherish the great stories and memories that we have.

Adolpho is survived by his son, Kap A. Ugalde and Cathy of Fields; Connie Burlile and Les of Emmett, Idaho, Kenny Holloway of Kuna, Idaho, Dave Holloway of Emmett, Idaho; sisters-in-law, Sammie Ugalde and Donna Ugalde; grandchildren, Darcy Ugalde, Shane Ugalde, Tami Brutsman, Kelly McCraken, Raymond Smith,         Jamie Holloway, Kerri Bryant, Kyle Holloway,  Morgan Holloway, Kelsey Robinson, Kimberly Holloway; 15 great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews, and his many great friends.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Elsie; parents, Antonio and Paula Ugalde; brothers, Jaime Ugalde, Emilio Ugalde, Theodore Ugalde and Daniel Ugalde; sisters, Helen Olson, Anne Mendieta and Aurelia Jones.

Adolpho requested no service. It was his wish to be cremated and be placed at one of his favorite spots where he loved to ride.


OBIT DickensonbwRonald Omar Dickenson, 58, passed away from heart failure Sept. 15 in Springfield.

Ron was born Aug. 2, 1956, in Burns to Earl and Kinuko (Kim) Dickenson. He attended Burns grade school and graduated from Burns Union High School in 1975. He married Becky Masson May 13, 1977, in Burns. Ron worked at the Edward Hines plywood mill for a few years before moving to Oakridge, then to Springfield, where he worked at Rosboro lumber Company until his death.

Ron loved his family, fishing, hunting and camping. He was a very generous, kind-hearted man with a great sense of humor and a quick wit. His broad, warm smile could be seen a mile away. His favorite camping spots were Steens Mountain, Spring Creek and Curry Garden Creek. He liked playing pinochle, and was usually on the winning team.

Ron is survived by his wife of 37 years, Becky; daughter, Crystal, and her husband, Tom Barto; son, Chad; three grandchildren, Joshua and Kayla Barto, and Cooper Dickenson, all of Springfield; mother, Kinuko (Kim) Dickenson; sisters, Janet Vinson of Burns and Ella Whiteaker of Hines; and brother David Dickenson of Burns.

He was preceded in death by his father, Earl Dickenson, in 1985.

A private memorial will be held in July in Burns.


Wednesday October 1

Posted on October 1st in Community Calendar

Harney County Court meets the first and third Wednesday of each month at the Harney County Courthouse, 450 North Buena Vista, at 10 a.m.

The Harney County Community Response Team (CRT) meets the first Wednesday of every month from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Community Center, 484 N. Broadway. The CRT consists of anyone interested in what is going on in the county as it relates to business and industry. County, city and tribal leaders provide general information to the public regarding xisting programs and recruitment efforts.

High Desert Park and Recreation District board of directors meets the first Wednesday of each month in their office at Ponderosa Village, at 7 p.m.

Burns Elks Lodge, 118 N. Broadway, meets the first and third Wednesday of each month at 7:30 p.m.

Free cardio-kick classes are offered Wednesday evenings, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., at Faith Baptist Church. The classes are good for beginning to moderate workouts, and everyone is welcome. For more information call 541-573-7777.

Bring babies to Lapsit Storytime at Harney County Library, 80 W. D St., each Wednesday at 10 a.m. Enjoy music, stories, rhymes and fingerplays especially for babies and toddlers.

Storytime for preschoolers is scheduled at the Harney County Library, 80 W. D St., each Wednesday at 10:30  a.m. Contact the Harney County Library for more information, 541-573 6670.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets each Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns.

ALANON, a support group for friends and families of alcoholics, meets each Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns. Please use the back door on the south side of the building. All interested are welcome.

 


Thursday October 2

Posted on October 1st in Community Calendar

Burns Butte Sportsmen’s Club meets the first Thursday of each month at the State Office Building, 809 W. Jackson, at 7 p.m.

A Walking Class is held each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from  10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. indoors at the Harney County Senior and Community Services Center.

Kiwanis Club of Burns-Hines meets for a no-host luncheon at noon each Thursday at Bella Java, 314 N. Broadway in Burns.

A Women’s AA meeting is held every Thursday at noon at Foursquare Church, 74 S. Alvord, Burns.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets at noon each Thursday at Hines City Hall, 101 E. Barnes. Call 541-573-2896.

Tai Chi for Better Balance with Diane Rapaport is held each Tuesday and Thursday at Harney County Senior and Community Services Center from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. — free.


Friday October 3

Posted on October 1st in Community Calendar

Oregon Old Time Fiddlers, District 9, meets the first, third and fourth Friday of each month. Call Micky, 541-573-2515, for time and place.

A recovery group, “Celebrate Recovery,” meets each Friday at the Harney County Church of the Nazarene, 311 Roe Davis Ave. in Hines. Dinner is served at 5:30 p.m. The main meeting is held at 6 p.m. and small group sessions are at 7 p.m. For more information, call 541-573-7100.

Alcoholics Anonymous meets each Friday at Symmetry Care at 5 p.m.


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